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Welcome to the Davidson Group

This is the personal website of Prof. Donald J. Davidson, highlighting research and engagement activities. For Professor Davidson’s professional website within the University of Edinburgh, please see the Centre for Inflammation Research.
View Professor D.J. Davidson’s profile on the Centre for Inflammation Research website

What is our Research Focus?

Our research focuses on understanding the physiological importance of host defence peptides to our ability to combat bacterial and viral infections. In addition, we study the potential of host defence peptides in the development of novel therapeutic approaches, with the potential to circumvent problems of microbial resistance to conventional treatments by enhancing natural defences.

What is our Research Group Ethos?

In 2020 our research team worked together to create a statement detailing the group’s responsibilities and expectations, which we hope all future members of the team will also use as a guiding framework.

View the Davidson Group Ethos Statement

Research

Find out about our research

Publications

See our group’s recent research publications

Information for the Public

Get closer to our work

RESEARCH FOCUS

We focus on the role of host defence peptides (HDP; also known as antimicrobial peptides) as modulators of inflammation, immunity and cell differentiation & death in infectious and inflammatory diseases. We have particular interest in diseases of the lungs (including infections with RSV and influenza, and cystic fibrosis) and the skin (including atopic dermatitis), as well as novel approaches to cancer immunotherapy and extending our knowledge of inflammatory processes to the development of novel therapeutics.

NEWS

Cystic Fibrosis mouse macrophage paper out

NEW PAPER Our latest paper, by Jonny Gillan, from Robert Gray’s group, is now published in the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis – freely available to read. This research shows that a commonly used mouse model of cystic fibrosis, in which…
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Bronchiectasis lipid mediators paper out

NEW PAPER New publication from Pallavi Bedi, arising from our collaboration with Adam Hill and Adriano Rossi, is now published in Thorax, demonstrating a dysregulation of lipid mediators in bronchiectasis, with excess proinflammatory lipids, and showing that LXA4 can improve…
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Edinburgh Science Festival 2021 Walking Tour

Walking Through the COVID-19 Vaccine 26th June – 11th July 2021 Suitable for ages 8+ As part of the University of Edinburgh College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine’s contribution to the 2021 Edinburgh Science Festival, members of the Centre for…
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Low density neutrophils paper out

NEW PAPER Latest paper from Gareth Hardisty, working with Robert Gray’s research team, is now published in Frontiers in Immunology, freely available. link to paper This research suggests conclude that increased Low Density Neutrophil (LDN) numbers in disease reflect the…
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@p_openshaw: In a randomized trial in Bangladesh, increased wearing (13.3%, up to 42.3%) reduced symptomatic #COVID in villages by 35% (adjusted prevalence ratio = 0.65 [0.45, 0.85]). Masks are an effective method to reduce symptomatic SARS-CoV-2. https://t.co/8YMtKhWJCD
@djdavidsonlab
@jburnmurdoch: NEW: today’s update from Gauteng, now on a log scale to better show current trajectories. Steepness of lines shows how much faster the growth in cases and positivity is now vs past waves, and hospital admissions are now steepening too as the acceleration in cases feeds through. https://t.co/xBNGzxmwhC
@djdavidsonlab
@adamhamdy: 6. I'm not planning to resume COVID19 tweeting. I just wanted to say media and policy makers need to stop listening to those who've been wrong about almost everything in this pandemic. People who said there would be no second wave, that herd immunity could be achieved,
@djdavidsonlab
@adamhamdy: 1. A few of us warned about the consequences of allowing SARS-CoV-2 to spread in January and February 2020. We were called alarmists. We warned coronaviruses escape immunity over time as a result of waning immunity or viral evolution. We've now seen both with SARS-CoV-2.
@djdavidsonlab
@chrischirp: This is insane. All 120 people were vaccinated and had neg test before attendance. The index person had returned from SA just before but didn't test positive (with omicron) until couple days after party https://t.co/oquco3aLQU
@djdavidsonlab

Donald J. Davidson is a medical graduate of the University of Edinburgh who chose to pursue a scientific research career. He completed a PhD at the MRC Human Genetics Unit, studying the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease, then was awarded a Wellcome Trust Travelling Research Fellowship to undertake post-doctoral training in innate immunity research at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. After four years in Canada, he was recruited to the MRC / University of Edinburgh Centre for Inflammation Research, where he has developed an independent research group, focused on host defence peptides and pulmonary innate defence mechanisms, funded as a Wellcome Trust Research Career Development Fellow, and subsequently as an MRC Senior Non-clinical Fellow, before being awarded the personal Chair of Host Defence and Inflammation Biology.

Portrait photo of Professor Davidson

Lab Members

Lauren Melrose

Lauren Melrose

Research Technician

Jonathan Gillan

Jonathan Gillan

Postdoctoral Researcher

Jenny Shelley

Jenny Shelley

PhD Student

Sam Walker

Sam Walker

PhD Student

SOFIA SINTORIS

SOFIA SINTORIS

PhD Student

University of Edinburgh Centre for Inflammation Research

The group is part of the University of Edinburgh Centre for Inflammation Research; a multidisciplinary centre established in 1999 to bring together a critical mass of internationally outstanding researchers in inflammation, harnessing the skills of basic and clinical scientists to conduct internationally competitive research on the roles of inflammation in health and disease, in order to develop new approaches toward diagnosis, prevention and treatment.

Picture of the Queen's Medical Research Institute building